Search Results for: climate

How much observed climate change is man-made?

That human activities influence global climate is beyond doubt, but the level of this anthropogenic contribution to climate change remains uncertain. In a paper published today in the journal Nature Climate Change, Potsdam-based climate scientist Gerrit Hansen and her Berkeley Lab colleague Dáithí Stone present a systematic assessment of anthropogenic climate change for the range […]

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On climate change, nudge theory and the nanny-state

I have been approached by a hydra-headed PR agency working for an unnamed client which may or may not be a pseudo-libertarian climate-sceptic lobby group known as the Institute for Public Affairs. I say this, as an IPA statement on plain-packaging laws is linked to from the missive. In the message received today, it is […]

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Somerset floods – divine retribution for Tory climate change heresy

Flood waters inundating farmland in the Somerset levels of southwest England are the result of climate change scepticism at the heart of the Conservative government, or so implieth Damian Carrington in the Guardian. The guns are out for environment secretary Owen Paterson, who once declared that man-made global warming is nothing but a load of […]

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Clearing up a climate of misunderstanding

We hear much talk of a scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change, or at least we used to. Global warming has since fallen down the political agenda. At the same time there is a challenge to the thesis from mostly but not exclusively right-wing commentators who claim that there is no scientific consensus. They insist […]

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Climate engineering could lead to less rain

Among political procrastinators of a technocratic bent, the favoured solution to climate change is geoengineering. For example, artificially reducing the amount of sunlight reaching Earth’s surface by mimicking the effects of volcanos which release large quantities of sulphur dioxide into the atmosphere. The thinking is that, if we fail to radically reduce atmospheric carbon dioxide […]

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Climate science: the fightback

Suzanne Goldenberg’s article in the Guardian today features the embattled Penn State climate scientist Michael Mann. As is common with such biographical pieces, there is a book behind it, and Mann’s soon to be published “The hockey stick and the climate wars: Dispatches from the front lines” looks to be one worth reading. Mann can […]

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Climate misperceptions

While there is near-unanimous agreement among climate scientists that Earth’s average surface temperature has increased from pre-industrial levels, and that human activity is a principal cause of global warming, opinion polling carried out by climate change communications specialist Edward Maibach and colleagues shows that a significant proportion of the general public in the United States […]

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Mapping the pace of climate change

Climate change is in the eyes of many synonymous with global warming. One predicted consequence of global warming is a gradual poleward drift of animals and plants as their existing environments become uncomfortably hot and dry. Our climate is changing, but the simple picture of warming and migration can mask the real-world complexity of climate […]

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The emotional effect of climate porn

Regular readers will be aware that, while I follow the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change, I have a dim view of sensationalist attempts at conveying the message. Al Gore’s Oscar-winning film An inconvenient truth had me grinding my teeth, even though I acknowledge the skill that went into the making of this work of […]

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Climate – the interplanetary connection and beyond

Last week I referred to a recent article in the Earth science trade rag Eos concerned with natural climate variability, and how one distinguishes this from anthropogenic effects. In the 6 September 2011 issue of the same journal, Nathan Schwadron and Harlan Spence look at the interplanetary space environment, and ask to what degree this affects […]

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